Resilient Family

Will Our Children Bounce Back?

As we approach the Fall semester, more and more parents are reaching out for advice on how to talk to their children about returning (or not returning) to school. There are a handful of parents posing a very thought-provoking question: “Will this pandemic have a lasting impact on my children?” My knee-jerk reaction might be unexpected, but my response is “I hope so.” A broader response would be, “I hope it has a lasting impact on ALL of us.” Learn More...

10 Tips for Preparing Your Child for Activities Outside of the Home Following the Pandemic

For months now, parents have been explaining to children the need to stay home for protection from the spread of Coronavirus.  Especially at the beginning of the Pandemic, many parents experienced an intense fear of potential germs that could bring home the virus and spread to family members.  In well-intentioned cautions to children and with nearly neurotic (eck-hem, I’m talking about myself here…) cleaning procedures upon returning home from public places, parents may have inadvertently shared their own fear and panic regarding the dangers of Coronavirus, both consciously and unconsciously, with their children.  Now, as families begin to return to activities outside of their homes, children are asking, “Am I safe away from home?” Some are even experiencing their own anxiety and panic about life outside of their Coronavirus-free homes.  Here are 10 Tips for Preparing Your Child for Activities Outside of the Home, which can help reduce everyone’s anxiety about doing so: Learn More...

9 Tips for Getting Your Child to Wear a Mask

Like many parents, I’ve been wondering how I’m going to get my child to wear a mask once the Shelter at Home time is over.  I’ve done some research, by both chatting with other parents and some trial and error on my own at home, and I’ve had some success!  So I thought I would share some tips with all of you for you to try with your children at home! I’ve come up with 9 Tips for getting your children (ages 2 and up) to wear a mask.  For children 2 and younger, or if your child has a medical condition where use of a mask may be questioned, please consult your pediatrician first.  Let’s get started! Learn More...

Pandemic Coronavirus (Covid-19) causes parents across the world to become instant homeschoolers.

10 Ideas for Creating a New Routine at Home During the Coronavirus (Covid-19) Pandemic

By Bridget Morgan, LMFT and Lacey Ryan, LMFT, RPT-S

As the last few weeks have unfolded, more and more families have adjusted to new ways of living as we Shelter at Home during the Coronavirus (Covid-19) Pandemic.  For families who have children, many parents are pulling triple duty of parent, homeschooling teacher, and employee while working from home.  This is difficult and overwhelming to manage, only worsened by the anxiety of how this Pandemic will continue to change our lives in the coming days.  In fact, it’s impossible to manage!  So we decided to offer you some tips to get you through the coming weeks at home. Learn More...

When Celebrations are Tough

Holidays, Parties, Weddings, and Baby Showers.  They are celebrations of joy, right? They definitely are, but for some, they can also be painful reminders of what (or who) is missing from our lives.

For those who have experienced a loss, the first year is a year full of “firsts” without our deceased loved one.  There’s our first birthday, their first birthday, first Mother and/or Father’s Day, first Christmas…you get the idea.  It’s difficult to carry on with the world around us during those seasons when we feel that we are drowning in our own grief.  Those first holidays and celebrations are painful reminders to what we already know – that that loved one will never again celebrate with us.  Even after the first year of a significant loss, there are still certain times of year when missing our loved one hurts a little more, no matter how long we’ve been without them. Learn More...

Problematic Behaviors in children are the warning signals to adults that they need support.

The Red Flags of Challenging Childhood Behaviors

Seeing Behaviors as Red Flags

When children demonstrate behavioral problems, it’s a signal to the grownups in charge that they need support in some way.  Children communicate to adults how they are doing primarily through their behavior.  This is due to normal brain development.  Because the areas of the brain that are responsible for expression through language (verbally communicating, “I’m not ok.”) are still developing, children show us how they are feeling through their behavior. Learn More...

research proves spanking ineffective and harmful

On the Topic of Spanking…

For more than 10 years, I’ve worked with families who come in to see me while (because of) experiencing childhood behavioral challenges. Over the years, I’ve handled parents’ questions about spanking in different ways as a Therapist. As my experience and expertise in this field have grown, my opinions and recommendations about corporal punishment have become more and more bold.

Corporal punishment has never “set well” with me, from a theoretical standpoint. And it just feels wrong, from a person standpoint.  Let’s stop and think about it for a minute.  An adult, with a fully developed brain, who is much bigger and stronger than a child is intentionally physically hurting a child, who has a developing brain not yet capable of rational thinking, to correct a behavior with which the adult is dissatisfied about. What?! That doesn’t make sense to me. If an adult physically harmed another adult, this would warrant an assault charge.  Children are people too, and it’s about time our parenting approaches reflected that. Learn More...

A Reference For Talking with Your Children About Traumatic World Events

Some time ago, I was working with a teenage girl in therapy to address her anxiety and fearfulness, which was impacting her ability to participate in activities outside of her home.  Primarily, her anxiety presented as a constant worry that Something bad is going to happen.  We had been steadily making progress in therapy as she was learning that the world around her wasn’t always so dangerous, and then our city experienced a traumatic, hate-filled, violent event.  The session after that incident in our town, she sat across from me on the couch and asked me a question that struck me and still does to this day, “How can we try to convince ourselves that the world is safe when really it isn’t?”  It was a very raw, emotional question, and I was honest with her that day when I replied, “I don’t know.” Learn More...

Toddler Meltdowns

As a parent of a toddler, this article titled “Toddlers, Meltdowns and Brain Development: why parents need to ditch traditional discipline” on www.RaisedGood.com really struck me.  Here’s an excerpt:

“…remember a tantrum is not a reflection on you. Let’s repeat that; your child’s tantrum is not a reflection on you or your parenting. What is a reflection on you is your response to the tantrum. Can you find the courage to disable generational imprinting and cultural expectations and be the calm in your child’s storm? You cannot control another person, but you can choose your response.” Learn More...