What is a Gap Year and Why Should I be Aware of it?

A term you may not have heard of is “gap year.” If you have teenagers, you may want to consider putting this term on your radar for your child to consider. Taking a gap year means a high school graduate takes a year off of academic training before pursuing additional training or education. If a graduate in May of 2024 takes a gap year, they wouldn’t pursue additional education until the summer or fall of 2025. Learn More...

Does My Child Need Therapy?

Does My Child Need Therapy?

Parents seek out our services for several reasons. Sometimes parents know that a big family change or stressor is in the child’s future and they want to proactively provide their child with a resource (a trusted therapist) which will help them through that transition. For these parents, helping and encouraging their children to manage the emotions related to that transition/change in healthy ways is their priority.  Other times, parents are concerned or worried about an event that has already happened. A traumatic event or social stressor has impacted their child and they want to provide their child with a healthy outlet to cope. Most often, parents have observed a change in their child’s behavior or the way their child is interacting with others and are seeking to understand how to help them and resolve that problem. Learn More...

Setting Boundaries During the Holiday Season

Is this the “most” time of year for you too? While there are breaks from school (and maybe work too), many of us find our schedules BUSIER than ever with extra holiday celebrations and fun events. A friend shared with me last holiday season that their family had SEVEN family holiday gatherings to attend within a week’s time. She, her partner, and their children were all exhausted and at each other’s throats by the end of it all. It was too much. Here’s an invitation to set some proactive boundaries in your lives now, before the “most” time of year gets the best of you and your family too! Learn More...

7 Ways to Help Your Child Cope with Boredom During the Holiday Break

Holiday breaks usually include some much needed downtime for many families. With a scheduled break from schoolwork and tests, large projects at work, & extracurriculars like sports and clubs, most families welcome the chance to rest and recover from such busy day-to-day lives. A drastic change from going from “go-go-go” to such a relaxed schedule can reveal some needs your family may have. Here are some things you can do to help with that adjustment: Learn More...

International Transgender Day of Remembrance

Today we take a moment of reflection to acknowledge today as International Transgender Day of Remembrance. Transgender Day of Remembrance focuses our attention on the violent reality that our transgender and nonbinary siblings experience in their day to day lives, and brings to our attention the names and stories of the individuals who have lost their lives this year to this type of senseless violence. As we lift up the names of these bright lights that have been lost to our families and communities, we also acknowledge the disproportionate impact that this kind of violence has not only on economically disadvantaged members of our community, femme presenting members of our communities but disproportiately upon BIPOC members of our communities. We mourn these individuals while acknowledging that this violence only ends when people of privilege in our communities take active steps to address and eliminate not only transphobia, but also classism, misogyny, and racism. Only when we address the total marginalization of individuals for all facets of their identity can we help assure their safety. To learn more, and to hear the stories of those we’ve lost this year, please visit: https://www.hrc.org/resources/fatal-violence-against-the-transgender-and-nonbinary-community-in-2023 For resources for your own learning about allyship with the transgender community, please see HRC’s booklist for educators and caregivers: https://welcomingschools.org/resources/educators-caregivers-booklists

Facing Religious Trauma and Spiritual Harm Together

 In today’s diverse and dynamic world, individuals navigate a multitude of beliefs and ideologies. For some, faith is a source of strength, solace, and community. However, for others, religious experiences can leave deep emotional scars that can often feel overwhelming. Creative Family Counseling understands the importance of addressing the challenges faced by those who have experienced religious trauma and spiritual harm. If you have experienced wounds related to negative experiences of faith or spiritual beliefs, therapy can help you sort through your emotions and help process the traumatic experiences of your life toward spiritual healing. But what exactly is religious trauma? How can therapy help? This article will explore some of the ways that religious trauma can affect you, where it comes from, and how therapy can help you sort through your beliefs and feelings. Learn More...

Is EMDR Right For Me?

This is a question I’ve been asked many times over the past several months. My answer is often a resounding “Yes!” due to the many applications for this intervention. If you’ve heard the buzz around EMDR and wonder if it’s right for you, here is some information you might consider for yourself and then discuss it with a therapist trained or certified in EMDR.

EMDR, or Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, is a therapeutic intervention that allows people to heal from traumatic or disturbing life events. We all have neural pathways in our brains that help us make sense of the world around us. However, these pathways can become blocked after a traumatic experience. Using eye movements or other bilateral stimulation, EMDR helps reprocess the memories related to those events, thus removing the blocks in the neural pathways. Once the block is removed, the brain begins to heal from the traumatic event. Learn More...

Non-Suicidal Self Injury (or self-harm) vs. Suicidality

The difference between Suicidality and Self Injury is INTENT. 

Individuals engage in self-harm to feel “something” other than numb or empty. Sometimes self-harm can be a way to signal to others that they need help or the harming behavior has become a maladaptive coping skill. Individuals who express suicidality are experiencing hopelessness, despair, and thinking that the end of their life could be the solution to their problems. Although both conditions can stem from similar situations or contexts, self-harm does not always indicate that the individual wants to end their life.  Learn More...

Limiting the Overwhelm of Parents: Making Therapy More Accessible to Children and Teens at School

As parents, we want our kids to be happy and healthy. Oftentimes this means running them all over town for various events and appointments – wellness visits, sick visits, tutoring, dentist appointments, lessons, sports activities, vision tests, club events…and the list goes on and on.  While their happiness and success is a priority, what happens when crises arise which add to the already over-scheduled family schedule? When our children experience mental health symptoms and concerns, this moves up quickly on the priority list of weekly commitments. Parents who are already burning up the road with mileage then try to find more time in the day to fit in one more (very important) therapy visit. Learn More...

Is This Normal? When Should I Seek Help for My Child?

By Erica R. Myers, LPCC-S, RPT-S Clinical Director Creative Family Counseling

Mental illness can begin at any age and affects everyone – regardless of socioeconomic status, background, or upbringing. It is essential to recognize that the onset of mental illness is typically during childhood and the teenage years, meaning parents must be educated on the potential signs and risks. While mental illness can be scary, it is highly treatable. Those who seek early treatment for their child can find fantastic outcomes in therapy. Learn More...